Evelyn Marie Kivipelto Groe

Evelyn Marie Kivipelto Groe passed away on November 3, 2021 with her nieces Barbara Litchfield, Liisa Lamppa, Liisa Hill, Mary Zupancich and Becky Gaulke by her side.
She was born on March 9, 1930 in Ely, Minnesota to Andrew and Mary Kivipelto. Evelyn was married to Richard E. Groe in December of 1959. They made their home in the Minneapolis area. Pride in her Finnish heritage and the love of Burntside Lake brought the couple to Ely every summer.
After graduating from St. Olaf College and the University of Minnesota, she embarked on a teaching career, flight attendant for Capitol Airlines and retired as an Executive from Control Data.
Evelyn was preceded in death by her husband Richard; her siblings Irma Riikola (Arnold), Oiva Kivipelto (Marge), Aimo Kivipelto (Lota), and Ruth Mikich (Arden).
She is survived by numerous beloved nieces and nephews and bother in law Jim Groe (Betty).
A celebration of life was held in Woodbury, Minnesota.

“Death is not the extinguishing of a light, but rather putting out
the lamp because the Light has come.” Marie Kivipelto Groe passed away on November 3, 2021 with her nieces Barbara Litchfield, Liisa Lamppa, Liisa Hill, Mary Zupancich and Becky Gaulke by her side.
She was born on March 9, 1930 in Ely, Minnesota to Andrew and Mary Kivipelto. Evelyn was married to Richard E. Groe in December of 1959. They made their home in the Minneapolis area. Pride in her Finnish heritage and the love of Burntside Lake brought the couple to Ely every summer.
After graduating from St. Olaf College and the University of Minnesota, she embarked on a teaching career, flight attendant for Capitol Airlines and retired as an Executive from Control Data.
Evelyn was preceded in death by her husband Richard; her siblings Irma Riikola (Arnold), Oiva Kivipelto (Marge), Aimo Kivipelto (Lota), and Ruth Mikich (Arden).
She is survived by numerous beloved nieces and nephews and bother in law Jim Groe (Betty).
A celebration of life was held in Woodbury, Minnesota.

“Death is not the extinguishing of a light, but rather putting out
the lamp because the Light has come.”