Columnists

Sun
10
Sep

Bush Pilot: My father

My Father<BR><BR>Dad was born in Cornwall, England on December 20, 1884. First, some geography and history. <BR><BR>Cornwall is in the southwest of England and narrows down to a point. The Scilly Islands are 25 miles further to the southwest. Cornwall is the land of King Arthur, Tintagel Castle, Camelot, the Knights of the Round Table and the Pirates of Penzance. The ruins of a castle still remain at Tintagel.<BR><BR>Tin was mined here since BC. Other metals included copper, tungsten, zinc and silver. 200 years ago much of the world's copper came from Cornwall. It has been suggested that anywhere in the world that a mine exists, you will find some Cornishmen at work. (Information on the mines is from "This England," published by The National Geographic Society).

Sun
03
Sep

From the miscellaneous drawer - End of summer

Some weeks there just is NO TIME. This summer was often like that. <BR><BR>We, all Elyites, put on a good show. We welcome visitors. We embrace visitors' need for the escape which they find here. We create events. We are open in our friendliness. We are concerned for the visitors' welfare and their entertainment. We yield to visitors' need for peace and quiet.<BR><BR>We want every meal eaten here to be tasty and memorable. We want every night under the stars or in lodging to be comfortable and of good value. Where necessary, we hook people up with all the accoutrements of city life - computers, cell phones, fax and whatever else it takes for someone to get away and still stay in touch with the office. <BR><BR>We want visitors to come back and try our fall, winter and early spring environments when we have even more time to share, more concern to give them.

Sun
27
Aug

In the front row - Football

Ely's high school football team won't have any time to get its feet wet during the 2006 season.<BR><BR>A Class A team, the Wolves face two Section 7AA contenders in their first three games, starting with Friday night's opener at Greenway (Coleraine) and continuing with a Sept. 15 home date against defending 7AA champion Esko.<BR><BR>Sandwiched in between is a Sept. 8 visit by Carlton - like Ely, a Class A team - at Ely School Stadium.<BR><BR>That's quite a tall order for an Ely team trying to bounce back after an 0-9 season last fall, but head coach Darren Visser and the Wolves seem primed for the challenge.<BR><BR>"We start off with Greenway and they're always going to be a powerhouse and follow up with Carlton and they're improved, and then you follow that up with Esko," said Visser.

Sun
20
Aug

In the front row - New coach

As little as six weeks ago, Steve Crittenden had no idea he'd be leading a community college football program.<BR><BR>But the sudden resignation of Vermilion Head Coach Keith Turner changed all of that, and Crittenden, a VCC assistant since 1997, was tapped as the school's new head coach without much advance warning and with precious little time to prepare for the 2006 season.<BR><BR>Crittenden has had to do some adjusting on the fly, but he - and the Ironmen - are anxious to kick off the fall campaign.<BR><BR>"It's been exciting, challenging and at the same time a little nervewracking," Crittenden said Tuesday.<BR><BR>Vermilion, which opened practice Aug. 12, makes its regular season debut at 8 p.m. Friday in St.

Sun
13
Aug

Letters from Ely - Just one second

Just One Second<BR><BR>Ely merchants are dishonest, and I have proof. <BR><BR>Over at J&L Hardware Hank, a new White power mower caught my eye. Although I could have done it myself, Jerry insisted on taking time from his busy day to replace the original blade with the mulching blade I wanted, saying "It'll just take a second!" <BR><BR>It actually took 10 minutes, a broken box-end wrench and some barely audible (yet interesting!) new words. But he stayed with it and got it done, and if the original blade was that tight, maybe I couldn't have done it myself. Thanks, Jerry. <BR><BR>Down the street, there was a line at the Ace Hardware counter. When it was my turn, I sadly noted I hadn't been able to find a special tooling bit I needed.

Sun
06
Aug

From the miscellaneous drawer - Of journalists past

It was difficult to believe the enthusiasm for the Ely Echo spouted by those friendly, knowledgeable faces in the 1980s. He came from a journalism background and his wife was an Ely girl who became an attorney and Realtor. They were a striking couple, articulate and vivacious.<BR><BR>"Slabs Slabodnik was my dad," Pidge told me when explaining why they come to Ely from the Twin Cities. "We have a place on White Iron."<BR><BR>Their love of visiting Ely during the summer conflicted with husband John Hodowanic's job as executive director of the World Press Institute. Summer is when the 10 world journalists arrive in St. Paul to spend four months learning about the United States.<BR><BR>The Echo and the Hodowanics combined our interests and the WPI-Ely connection began.<BR><BR>The first year the Echo held the public forum in the JFK Cafeteria and lunch was at Vertin's.

Sat
29
Jul

From the miscellaneous drawer - Lesson learned

In the long ago summer when the old homestead burned on the other side of the hill, I learned a life lesson which stayed with me. As usual I was staying with my aunt (my mother's sister) and uncle for part of the summer.<BR><BR>The farm house which burned had been my uncle's childhood home but had long since been abandoned. It was reached by walking from their newer farm home, through the meadow with fields of corn and hay on either side. <BR><BR>The old homestead's windmill still drew water for the milking cows and sheep grazed in the front yard which had a long time past had been the playground for my uncle. Did he have siblings? Perhaps a sister. I didn't know his family well. <BR><BR>There was a bad storm the night of the fire and I had awakened in my small room under the eaves of the white clapboard house to see the flames rise over the hill, not far from Spoon River where the cows grazed in the timber.

Sun
23
Jul

Letters from Ely Courage

Courage <BR><BR>There is courage in the little girl, hugging her mother and then walking alone toward her first day of school. And there is courage in the mother who must stand there watching her go. <BR><BR> There is courage in the 10 year old boy who has just stepped squarely upon a framing nail while playing at a construction site with friends. . . courage as he limps home with half the nail protruding through the top of his foot. There is courage in the mother who, without insurance or money for a doctor, first removes the nail in a single firm motion and then, tears streaming down her cheeks, pours tincture of iodine into the open wound as the boy's older sisters hold him down. <BR><BR>There is courage in the middle-aged couple whose love for their parents is anchored in a lifetime of reciprocal love. Courage in their acceptance that they alone can no longer give those parents the care they need.

Sat
15
Jul

Bush Pilot- Iron Mines of Ely

Part 3<BR><BR>Now, how about Miners Lake? In February 2000 1 received an email from Jim Cochran, who used to live in Calumet Location. The family left Ely in 1930 when he was 10 years old. I believe his father was a policeman for plant protection at the Oliver Iron Mining Company. I vaguely remember someone in officer’s uniform, but the name Kauppi comes to mind. I was six years old at the time.<BR><BR>Jim was in Ely in 1999 but didn’t see anyone he knew. He asked a man how long that lake had been there, and the man replied that the lake had always been there. Not so. <BR><BR>Jim said he walked home from Pioneer School (at Eighth Avenue and Camp Street) to Calumet Location, through the land where the lake is now. I walked that road often, along with many others. <BR><BR>After the bus unloaded students at Pioneer School, it continued on to Washington School.

Sat
08
Jul

Letters from Ely Quiet water

Quiet Water<BR><BR>It was almost time to put it all away for the season. But on this relatively balmy morning in mid-October, we managed to get the canoe out for one last day trip. The previous month I’d put together a small, four-by-eight-foot brush trailer as a tool to help in clearing the front woods. Today, that same trailer would perform reasonably well as a canoe caddy. The trailer rack is more than sturdy enough to support that heavy old Grumman - and loading a canoe onto a four-foot high trailer rack is much easier than wrestling it onto the top of the pickup/camper shell as we once did. Ahhhhh! Recreation is much more fun when it’s easy. Jane swears much less with this arrangement, she comes out with us more often . . . and I think her cooking has improved.<BR><BR>Today, son-in-law Eric and O.C. (my own eleven-year old) were eager for their last chance to put a line in the water. We had the canoe lashed down to the trailer in minutes.

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