Outdoors

Sun
13
Feb

Birdshot and backlashes

Stuff that comes in the mail:<BR><BR>Tom Copeland from out in Big Bear City, California, writes in that he and buddies Brian Dobry and Evan Durland will take off by canoe on a trip from Lake Superior to Hudson Bay this summer. They will be following the route of Eric Sevareid who made the trip in 1930 as a high school graduate. <BR><BR>Sevareid’s adventure is printed in the book “Canoeing with the Cree” which was a best seller and is still in book marts. A high point in that book was the fact that Sevareid and his paddle pal got somewhat out of sync toward the end of the trip and had a fist fight on the river bank before they finally got their act together and with help of the Cree finished at Hudson Bay.<BR><BR>Copeland and his crew worked at the Boy Scout Base east of Ely as guides for Scout troops going into the Boundary Waters. They figure they’ve got the skills and now want to test their endurance in an ultimate northern trip.

Sat
12
Feb

Hook and Bullet Club

The injury was a stupid one really, jumping out of the back of a pick-up truck and twisting an ankle on uneven ground. But this happened in town, and with some ice packs and hobbling around, all should be back to normal soon. <BR><BR>There are times and places where an injury, even one as basic as a twisted ankle, can lead to a lot more trouble.<BR><BR>Hunting is the perfect setting for injuries. Between walking over uneven terrain, you have tree stands, swamps, darkness, logs and slippery rocks to put the brakes on your expedition.<BR><BR>Plus there’s the all-too-common situation of pushing your physical limits beyond what your body is used to. If instead of typing on a computer you spend all day traipsing through the woods, you’ll feel the difference in a hurry.<BR><BR>But most hunters don’t really think about what could happen if an injury were to occur.

Fri
11
Feb

Dogs chasing, harassing wildlife a serious problem

Conservation officers from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) are receiving a growing number of reports about dogs chasing and harassing deer.<BR><BR>Minnesota DNR Chief Conservation Officer Mike Hamm suggests that most dog owners are not aware of what their dogs are up to when the dogs are out roaming. And, he added, they’re not being kind to the dog. <BR><BR>Conservation officers believe that people underestimate the potential for their dog to get into trouble. Many people do not believe that their dog would chase wildlife. <BR><BR>“People think it’s great that their dogs can run,” Hamm said. “But they don’t know what the dogs do when they are out of sight. Because the dog is well mannered when the owner is around, the owner underestimates the potential for their pet to chase wildlife. <BR><BR>In reality, the dog is out there doing what dogs do - following a scent and chasing down prey.

Sun
06
Feb

Birdshot and backlashes

The two deer came off the big island in Jasper Lake, cutting across the surface to the main shore. The only thing was, they figured out that they probably couldn't get to where they wanted. Too much slush. The deer were up to their bellies in snow and slush. They stopped and stood in the snow, looking around, probably discussing the matter.<BR><BR>One deer says to the other: "Boy, you're a star! You said we could cross the lake here and go over to that patch of dogwood for breakfast and now look! We are up to here in snow and slush!"<BR><BR>The other deer says: "Aw shut up! If you are so doggone smart, how come you didn't say the lake was full of slush?"<BR><BR>Anyway, wherever the deer were going, they changed their minds and headed for the nearest shore.

Sat
05
Feb

Trapper faces nearly $28,000 in fines, restitution; 195 pelts seized

Natural resources law enforcement work can be a lot like putting together a puzzle. Match the correct pieces and you complete the puzzle. In natural resources law enforcement, piece together the evidence and you make a case. <BR><BR>Several northern Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) conservation officers recently did that after receiving increased complaints of untagged traps and snares, trappers not tending traps, and snares and trap tampering in northeastern Minnesota.<BR><BR>Minnesota law requires traps or snares be marked or tagged with the number and state of the person’s driver’s license, or the person’s Minnesota identification card number, or the person’s name and mailing address.

Fri
04
Feb

Hook and bullet club

I remember the first incarnation of what is now commonly known as the Ragnar Fun Run. Back then it was called the Arctic Blast. The year was 1996. <BR><BR>Ten years later we’ve gone from the Arctic Blast to the Winter Blast to the Celebrity Blast to the Ragnar Fun Run to just the Fun Run.<BR><BR>Standing on stage at the Grand Ely Lodge I thought back to when this was an idea drawn up on a bar napkin. And to the successes and mistakes made along the way. <BR><BR>At first it was a fairly simple event but then it got complicated with seven Blast Points plus over 100 Check-In Points. We had a huge committee that met weekly and worked their tails off to make it all happen. <BR><BR>The money raised from the event back then went to the Minnesota Vikings Children’s Fund. Later we worked with the United Way.

Sun
30
Jan

Birdshot and backlashes

Joan Gilbertson, Bill Hudson and Joe Berglove were in Ely last week filming a news segment on snowshoes and snowshoeing for WCCO-TV. Hudson is the anchorman you see quite often on WCCO, Berglove is the cameraman who gets everything on film and Gilbertson is the producer who puts the show together.<BR><BR>They had been touring around the area, interviewing a snowshoe maker and looking for somebody on snowshoes. Maybe they were getting a little desperate, but they called up and wanted me to show up and do a little snowshoeing with Bill Hudson, which we did on a trail at Hidden Valley. High point was when I stumbled, fell into a snowdrift and had Hudson help get me back on my feet.

Fri
28
Jan

DNR Conservation Officer’s reports from the field

Conservation Officer John Velsvaag (Ely) checked anglers in the Ely and Tower area this past weekend, fishing was pretty slow overall. He also helped out on a snowmobile work detail in the Tower station. He received complaints on snowmobilers, including speeding and not stopping for stop signs. CO Velsvaag attended a K9 meeting during the week in St. Paul. Enforcement action was taken for snowmobilers not stopping for stop signs, registration violations, careless operation of a snowmobile and speeding. Snowmobiling conditions were good, but the slush continues to be a problem for anglers on area lakes.<BR><BR>CO Mike Lekatz (Ely) worked checks on fishing activity on area lakes throughout the week. He also worked checks on snowmobile activity on area lakes and trails. Latest snowfalls have created excellent riding conditions in the area. He started work on several deer registration cases received from DNR Wildlife. He also assisted the State Patrol and St.

Mon
24
Jan

Conservation Officer’s reports from the field

Conservation Officer Darin Fagerman (Grand Marais) worked the trout opener with CO Duncan. There were a number of people out fishing despite very cold temperature and wind. Most had luck catching splake. Violations included live minnows on a designated trout lake, no shelter license, no marking on shelters, and no fishing licenses or trout stamps in possession. CO Fagerman also received assistance from CO Brad Johnson and CO Duncan in capturing a timberwolf that wandered into someone's shed after the wolf had stepped into a trap. The snow is so deep that the wolf was able to walk right through an open window. The wolf was transported to a rehabilitator. <BR><BR>CO Kipp Duncan (Two Harbors) worked on winter fishing and snowmobile activity during the week. With heavy snow earlier in the week, and very cold temperatures later in the week, winter activities were somewhat slow.

Mon
24
Jan

Birdshot and backlashes

It was the first winter trout fishing opening that didn’t draw crowds. It was the first one this writer missed in maybe 30 years. We went skiing instead. <BR><BR>We were all set to go after trout on Saturday with our cousin’s son Frank, who is attending classes at Vermilion College. Friday night, Frank called to say his car wouldn’t start. See, Frank comes from Illinois where 20 or 30 below is not normal. He is attempting to adjust to northern Minnesota winters and one of the adjustments is learning that up here an ordinary car probably needs a block heater. Frank never heard of a block heater. He has now.<BR><BR>Frank and some of his college buddies had been fishing earlier in the winter for walleyes through the ice. He has acquired skis and learned cross country skiing. <BR><BR>But that was back in December when the temperature was in the teens. Now it is real winter.

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